Sudan March 2009

After we left Nairobi, we flew to Lokichokio and spent the night at a nice lodge where the NGO pilots stay.  Lokichokio is in the northern part of Kenya — the film The Constant Gardener was filmed there.  The asphalt roads are in such disrepair and full of potholes that the taxis and people with vehicles there just go off road when they come to a spot that is bad.  You would think they would just fix the road, but I guess not.  I have read, however, since our trip, that there are NGOs moving back into the area to feed people due to drought there. Here are a few pics from Lokichokio — before Dajo and after Dajo:

Relaxing in Lokichokio

Relaxing in Lokichokio

Trying to email home from Lokichokio

Trying to email home from Lokichokio

Thumbs up for the strawberry ice cream in Lokichokio

Thumbs up for the strawberry ice cream in Lokichokio

While we were in Dajo surviving the 130+ temps everyday, ice cream was the joke topic of conversation.  Upon arrival back in Lokichokio after our 8 days in Dajo, I saw ice cream listed on the menu board at the lodge.  Everyone thought I was joking because it had not been listed when we were there previously.  So Danny bought everyone ice cream.  And so I was giving a thumbs up for my huge bowl of strawberry ice cream.  It tasted wonderful!

Our Arrival in Dajo

Our Arrival in Dajo

Greeted with singing at the airstrip in Dajo

Greeted with singing at the airstrip in Dajo

Nuer and Buldit Women of the Dajo area

Nuer and Buldit Women of the Dajo area

Compound training center

Compound training center

Compound medical clinic

Compound medical clinic

Teaching a song to the women

Teaching a song to the women

Holding one of the local children

Holding one of the local children

I was sitting and listening during one of the teaching sessions and kept feeling someone touching the back of my hair.  This little boy had walked around behind me and was fascinated with my hair and how different it felt.  So he sat on my lap and followed me around nearly everyday.
Teaching a song with help of translators

Teaching a song with help of translators

I was responsible for leading and teaching worship while we were in Dajo.  I realized when I got there that I needed to take some time and scope out the situation and rethink my approach.  I tried teaching the women a new song through the translators while playing the guitar.  But they had never seen a guitar before and it proved to be too distracting.  So I did everything acapella.  And even though I had about 40 songs with me, I chose to only teach 2 songs so that they could fully learn them.
I did teach some of the young men some guitar basics and three chords at their request.  And during those lessons, I taught them some of the other songs.  They wanted very badly to learn everything I could teach them so that they in turn could teach the people after I was gone.  It was very gratifying to me that they wanted to learn.
More in the next post.
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About ksknitter

I wear many hats -- mother and grandmother, paralegal, knitter, bass player in a praise and worship band, gardener, cook, avid reader, good friend, good listener -- just to name a few. View all posts by ksknitter

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